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20131101
20131130
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
tavis: good evening from los angeles. tonight come a conversation with grammy-winning singer steve gyro -- steve tyrell. the songs of semicon. he will perform two of the most endearing. glad you have joined us, conversation from steve tyrell coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: grammy winner steve tyrell is introduction to popular moves -- popular music started at age 19. burts already working with bacharach. he went on to work with bonnie raitt before striking out as a performer in his own right. his latest cd is called "it's magic, the songs of semicon. kohn."ammy a little sneak review you did to this before the record even drive. >> last year. it was this semi-con -- it was the sammy kohn centennial. he was a great writer. nominatedll, he was 27 times for the academy awards, which is unbelievable. people wouldthat ask him what comes first, the music or the lyrics? he would say the phone call. [laughter] that is where he got his inspiration. five golden globes, just an amazing lyricist. year.xtending that this i
.com/nbr. >>> end of an era, steve balmer, microsoft ceo and chief sales meeting, bill gates gets emotional. what is next for the software maker and who will lead it? >> do it yourself. more people are and home depot is reaping rewards raising the outlook for the third time this year. it's not the only company profiting by the trends. >> pinched by pensions. tonight we head to chicago to see just how deep the problems run. all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for tuesday, november 19th. >>> good evening everyone. topping our news, three corporate giants, jp morgue chase, home depot, microsoft members of the dow index and making news today for different reasons. we begin with microsoft and shareholders meeting today but it wasn't a typical shareholders meeting. this was the final one for steve balmer who steps down as ceo next year and marks the beginning of a historic management changeover at the company. as microsoft's bored narrows the search for a new leader, the company will end a 38-year stretch where balmer and dates led. who might be next in charge. >> reporter: it was a
shutdown were likely tempered in the fourth quarter. steve liesman has more. >>> economic growth was hotter in the third quarter than investor expected but that could be cold comfort in the months ahead. the government gross domestic product rose 2.8% well ahead of the 2% consensus and the best quarterly number in a year. the data accounts for growth before the government shutdown and the controversial debt ceiling debate that many economist believe weaken growth in the current quarter. still, better to have more men tum than less. housing surged ahead by 14.6%, durable purchases by consumers up nearly 8% and exports up 4.5% and invenn tomorrowries, there was a big inventory, $86 billion. business equipment purchases fell and federal government fell by 1.7%. it's the strong growth in inventories with concerns about the shut down that makes economists concerned about the current quarters' growth. if they put too much on the shelf last quarter, they will spend this quarter working it off. it's seen at 1.6%, one shot in the arm for global growth could be from europe. it cutted lending rate wit
'm joined now by three technology reporters. arsi shahani, kqed news. michelle quinn. and steve penn. steve, twitter's ipo, the company still isn't profitable. is all this investor exuberance, does it make sense? or is this reminiscent of the dot com bubble? >> i would say it doesn't make sense if you just look at twitter's financial earnings. i mean, i think if you look at their share price, their stock price, how much it rose the first day, i think that had less to do with the fundamentals of twitter as a company than with supply and demand for that stock on the market. twitter has more than 200 million users, billions of people know about it. but the amount of stock they issued was relatively small in comparison. i think there is a little bit of a mismatch on the stock markets and that generated a big price spike. i also don't think that twitter is truly a pets.com. this is a company that has been -- >> let's hope not. >> -- been around for years, it's generating hundreds of millions in revenue, its revenue is growingpy 100% a year. it has a very engaged user audience. it's a real compan
when to reduce the stimulus program? steve liesman explains. >> the fed's october meeting showing this committee members general he believe the economy will improve enough to warrant a reduction in stimulus to the economy. specifically, they could reduce the amount of assets they purchase in quantitative easing if the fed's forecast for gradually improving economy comes true. the fed is deeply divided overcome mun case strategy as it fears stocks and bonds could sell off sharply and is trying to convince markets, if it does taper, that does not mean the central bank will raise interest rates any time sooner. ben bernanke struggled with the problem for months and there doesn't seem to be easy answers. we learned the special emergency october 16th meeting the day before the government was supposed to default to discuss what to do if that default happened. it's suggested it could take access in the event of a default. economic effects are temporary and limited. for "nightly business report", i'm steve liesman. >>> well, joining us now to talk more about the fed, bruce, chief economis
. >> they were a decent harmony band. steve and neil were in buffalo springfield, also great holiday -- harmony band's. putting our voices together, it changed all of our lives instantly. what ever they have vocally was born in less than a minute. we didn't have to rehearse it. it is so unbelievably good to us as musicians. we had to start laughing in the middle of the song because it was silly how these voices came together instantly to create something much bigger than themselves. you could not have written a book without talking about joni mitchell, the relationship that you had. >> i had met joni a couple of months earlier, and we made a vow to each other that we would see each other if we could. i flew from london to los angeles to be with joni. at dinnerstephen were that night. they just finished reversing into part harmony. really, a great song. had my harmony down and i had my recognition of that body language, how they are breathing and moving. that made the thing that made us laugh so deeply. i had to leave the band that i started. i had to do some drastic thinking. it was big enough
for a conversation with steve tyrell. it is magic. he will also perform two songs. that is next time. we will see you then. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs stations by viewers like you. thank you. >> hello and welcome to this is us. this week, we are at ballet san jose. we are going to see how a ballet goes from a year to performance. you will see everybody at work. we will also meet two artists from santa cruz. a sculptor with a great process. and finally, we will meet one of the principle dancers of san jose rain find out what it really takes to be a ballerina. we have lots of stories to share and it all
. in the new model, companions look for business opportunities. >> steve invested tens of millions of dollars in space x, a rocket maker, musk, nasa is paying space x more than a billion dollars, resupply missions to the international space station. in may 2012 space x was the first to launch a mission into the space station and proved the company could build and launch rockets reliably and cheaply. >> capture is confirmed of this dragon spacecraft. >> many of these news space companies are being built by software engineers and folks like the founder of space x, they can come from aerospace and conpewter scientist. silicon has proven it invents new industries and part of it is the culture, willing to take risks. >> part of it may also be a high tech approach to invite industries. that's dan and his team trying to do with satellites. >> a typical imaging satellite today costs between half a billion and $1 billion with a b, they are about the size of a suburban, and they take five to eight years, roughly to build. we're trying to build the iphone of satellites. we take it off the shelves to fly
phone 4 in june of 2010? >> we're having a little problem here. >> steve jobs couldn't get it to connect to the internet. embarrassing, but they worked it out. when facebook went public last year a technical error in nasdaq's system delayed the start of trading resulting in a loss to market makers of half a billion dollars. and those of you old enough to know who rube goldberg was may recall the rollout of the edsel, a ford motor company automobile so awful its name still is synonymous with a costly flop. and let's not talk about lehman brothers, bear stearns, aig, jpmorgan chase. the crash of '08. beside those calamities, obamacare's computer problems pale. oh, yes, mistakes are made by big corporations and big government. and although i was for something else, something simpler and easier to manage, i'm betting this will get fixed. as for those strident partisan voices crowing over obama care's first bad round, ask yourself if those weren't some of the same voices cheering on the invasion of iraq and promising victory would be swift and easy. ten years. trillions of dollars. and all th
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)